1. Articles from Healio

    healio.com

  2. 1-20 of 20
    1. Diet, exercise modifications can have ‘tremendous impact’ on pediatric cancer outcomes

      Joya Chandra Keri Schadler Diet and exercise may improve treatment outcomes among pediatric patients with cancer, according to a study conducted at The University of Texas MD Anderson Children’s Cancer Hospital. In addition, introducing energy balance interventions may reduce the risk for late effects during survivorship. Researchers at MD Anderson reviewed 67 pediatric oncology studies to evaluate the relationship between diet and exercise.

      Read Full Article
      Mentions: Treatment
    2. Kids First Data Resource Center set to ‘unlock potential’ of genomic data in pediatric cancer

      The NIH established the Kids First Data Resource Center, a pediatric cancer and rare disease data program that will enable clinicians and researchers to collaborate and access multiple genomic datasets.The resource center — the first of its kind in the pediatric research community — is designed to create a centralized, cloud-based database and discovery portal of clinical and genetic sequence data from various pediatric cancers and structural birth defects cohorts, such as congenital heart defects, hearing loss and cleft palate. The program also will develop analytical tools to provide access to this large-scale data for use in the discovery of novel ...

      Read Full Article
      Mentions: Hearing Loss
    3. Pregnancy in survivors of childhood cancer may confer elevated risk for cardiotoxicity

      Pregnancy may be linked to an increased risk for cardiotoxicity in patients who survived cancer in childhood, according to a research letter published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.Using data from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Kara A. Thompson, MD, from the department of cardiology at the University of Texas, Houston, and colleagues evaluated the cardiac outcomes of childhood cancer survivors who were pregnant and who were previously exposed to anthracyclines and/or chest radiation.

      Read Full Article
    4. Fertility after childhood cancer varies by sex, chemotherapy dose

      "The majority of female survivors of childhood cancers retained the ability to become pregnant in adulthood, according to study results published in The Lancet Oncology.  However, male cancer survivors — especially those treated with greater doses of alkylating drugs and cisplatin chemotherapy — appeared less likely to remain fertile, results showed."

      Read Full Article
      Mentions: Chemotherapy
    5. Parents of children with cancer may suffer post-traumatic stress for several years

      "Among parents of children who survived cancer, about 19% of mothers and 8% of fathers experienced partial post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) 5 years after treatment concluded. Among parents whose children died of cancer, 20% of mothers and 35% of fathers reported PTSD 5 years after their child’s death.  “Our study shows the threats to family for years after the initial treatment,” Louise von Essen, PhD, professor of clinical psychology in health care at Uppsala University in Sweden, told HemOnc Today. “For bereaved parents, and particularly mothers, trauma is most severe and impressive. However, parents of the children considered successfully ...

      Read Full Article
      Mentions: Treatment
    6. Intestinal obstruction a long-term risk for survivors of childhood cancer

      Survivors of childhood cancer face a long-term risk for intestinal obstruction requiring surgery as a result of their treatment, according to findings from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study.Late intestinal obstruction requiring surgery (IOS) appeared associated with an increased risk for mortality, making awareness of this condition even more important for survivors of childhood cancer, according to researchers.

      Read Full Article
      Mentions: Side Effects
    7. Treatment-related cardiac dysfunction common in adult survivors of childhood cancer

      Treatment-related cardiac dysfunction common in adult survivors of childhood cancer

      "Treatment-related cardiac death is the primary noncancer cause of mortality in adults treated for cancer in childhood, but optimal methods of early detection of cardiac dysfunction have not been determined. Researchers aimed to identify the prevalence of late-onset cardiac dysfunction in adult 10-year survivors of childhood malignancies from the St. Jude Lifetime Cohort Study, using echocardiographic evaluation of cardiac function, including 3-D LVEF, myocardial strain imaging and comprehensive diastolic assessment."

      Read Full Article
      Mentions: Treatment
    8. Late mortality rates have declined in pediatric cancer survivors

      CHICAGO — The modification of therapy to reduce late treatment effects has led to a reduction in all-cause mortality over the past 3 decades among survivors of pediatric cancer, according to findings from the phase 3 Childhood Cancer Survivor Study presented at the plenary session of the ASCO Annual Meeting. Among 5-year survivors, all-cause mortality at 15 years from diagnosis declined from 12.4% for those treated between 1970 and 1974 to 6% for those treated between 1990 and 1994.

      Read Full Article
      Mentions: Treatment ASCO
    9. Childhood cancer survivors likely to need federal income assistance as adults

      Long-term survivors of childhood cancers are more likely to claim supplemental social security income or social security disability insurance as adults than those without a cancer history, according to study findings. Although the 5-year survival rate from a diagnosis of childhood cancer is 80%, a significant number of those survivors face future health-related challenges as adults, including second malignancies, heart failure and other medical complications, according to study background.

      Read Full Article
    10. Pulmonary defects common among childhood cancer survivors

      Pulmonary defects common among childhood cancer survivors

      Survivors of pediatric cancers who underwent pulmonary-compromising therapies demonstrated a significant risk for long-term pulmonary complications, according to study results.Females and patients who underwent high-dose chest radiation faced a particularly increased risk for diffusion capacity declines over time and may benefit from subsequent monitoring, according to the researchers.

      Read Full Article
    11. Aprepitant effective for CINV prevention in children

      Aprepitant effective for CINV prevention in children

      The addition of aprepitant to ondansetron effectively reduced or prevented chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting in pediatric patients who underwent moderately or highly emetogenic chemotherapy, according to results of a randomized, double blind phase 3 trial.Oral aprepitant, a neurokinin-1 receptor agonist, often is combined with other antiemetic agents to help prevent chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting in adults.

      Read Full Article
    12. FDA approves Unituxin for pediatric patients with high-risk neuroblastoma

      FDA approves Unituxin for pediatric patients with high-risk neuroblastoma

      The FDA today announced the approval of dinutuximab for the treatment of pediatric patients with high-risk neuroblastoma, according to a press release from the drug’s manufacturer. Dinutuximab (Unituxin, United Therapeutics) is an antibody designed to bond to the surface of neuroblastoma cells and is approved as part of a multimodality regimen, including surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy for pediatric patients who achieved at least a partial response to prior first-line multi-agent, multimodality therapy.

      Read Full Article
    13. Chest CT imaging may safely be omitted from neuroblastoma surveillance for pediatric patients

      Chest CT imaging may safely be omitted from neuroblastoma surveillance for pediatric patients

      "Chest CT surveillance imaging identified thoracic disease progression or recurrence in 11 patients (14%). These cases of progression or recurrence included one paraspinal mass, one pulmonary nodule and nine nodals.  Researchers found that metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scans were able to detect thoracic disease in six of these patients. The other five patients had normal MIBG scans, but three also presented with symptoms. The other two patients were asymptomatic and had normal MIBG scans but had avid bone disease.  Researchers estimated that forgoing CT chest imaging from surveillance would reduce patients’ radiation burden by 42%. In analyses accounting for modern CT acquisition ...

      Read Full Article
      Mentions: Imaging MIBG
    14. FDA grants orphan drug designation to entrectinib for colorectal cancer

      FDA grants orphan drug designation to entrectinib for colorectal cancer

      "The FDA has granted orphan drug designation to entrectinib for the treatment of several molecularly-defined subtypes of colorectal cancer, according to the drug’s manufacturer.Entrectinib (Ignyta) is a selective tyrosine kinase inhibitor designed to treat patients with cancer who harbor activating alterations in TrkA, TrkB, TrkC, ROS1 or ALK."

      Read Full Article
      Mentions: Treatment ALK
    15. FDA grants orphan drug, rare pediatric disease status to entrectinib for neuroblastoma

      FDA grants orphan drug, rare pediatric disease status to entrectinib for neuroblastoma

      "The FDA has granted both orphan drug designation and rare pediatric disease designation to entrectinib for the treatment of neuroblastoma, according to the drug’s manufacturer.Entrectinib (Ignyta Inc.), a selective tyrosine kinase inhibitor, is a targeted therapeutic candidate intended for patients with cancers that contain activating alterations to TrkA, TrkB, TrkC, ROS1 or ALK."

      Read Full Article
      Mentions: Treatment ALK
    16. Model predicted risk for heart failure in childhood cancer survivors

      Model predicted risk for heart failure in childhood cancer survivors

      Models that included factors such as age at diagnosis, anthracycline doses, and radiation fields and doses accurately predicted risk for congestive heart failure in childhood cancer survivors through age 40 years, according to study results.Eric J. Chow, MD, MPH, an assistant member of the clinical research division at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, and colleagues evaluated data from 13,060 cancer survivors enrolled in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study.

      Read Full Article
    17. Primary tumor site affected clinical features, outcomes in pediatric neuroblastoma

      Primary tumor site affected clinical features, outcomes in pediatric neuroblastoma

      Tumor features and outcomes varied considerably by primary tumor site among children with neuroblastoma, according to study results.Kieuhoa T. Vo, MD, of Benioff Children’s Hospital and University of California, and colleagues used the International Neuroblastoma Risk Group database to evaluate data on 8,369 patients aged younger than 21 years who were diagnosed with neuroblastoma or ganglio neuroblastoma between 1990 and 2002.

      Read Full Article
      Mentions: MYCN
    1-20 of 20
  1. Categories

    1. Research:

      Cancer Cell, Case Report, Cells and Stem Cells, Clinical Research, Conferences, Disease Classification, Drug, Drug Delivery, Drug Resistance, Epigenetics and Epigenomics, General, Genetics, Genomics, Guidelines, Immune Therapy, Induction, Long Term Effects, Low / Intermediate Risk, Nanotechnology, Olfactory Neuroblastoma, Onco-Fertility, Oncogenesis, Other Cancers, Personalized Medicine, Pharma, Pre-Clinical, Prognostics, PubMed, Review, Small Molecules, Surgery, Survivorship, Trials, Tumor Biology, Virotherapy
    2. Business:

      Funding, IP, Pharma
    3. Non-Profit:

      Advocacy, Charity, Events, Foundation, Funding, Human Interest
    4. Press Release:

      Announcement, News, Pharma
    5. General:

      Adolescent and Young Adults, Bioethics, Blog, Burden of Treatment, Children & Families, Diagnosis and Detection, Drug Development, Epidemiology, Imaging, Incidence, Information, News, Overview of the Disease, Pain Control, Palliative Care, Psychosocial, Regulation, Side-Effects, Social, Supportive Care, Treatment
    6. Media:

      Audio, Blogs, Video