1. 1-24 of 40 1 2 »
    1. New method to preserve boy cancer patient fertility being developed

      New method to preserve boy cancer patient fertility being developed

      Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU) and Soroka University Medical Center researchers in Beer-Sheva, Israel are developing a cell culture system that for the first time can change testicular stem cells into sperm-like cells that may enable future fertility for boys with prepubertal cancer.

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      Mentions: Genetics
    2. Microbiome predicts blood infections in pediatric cancer patients

      Microbiome predicts blood infections in pediatric cancer patients

      Cancer patients receive essential medicines, fluids, blood and nutrients through long, flexible tubes called central venous catheters, or central lines. But every year in the United States, these central lines are associated with an estimated 400,000 blood infections, many of which are fatal, and which cost the healthcare system upwards of $18 billion dollars annually. But what if some or even many of these infections aren't, in fact, introduced by central lines?

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    3. Researchers identify an indirect way of countering a key genetic lesion in neuroblastoma

      Researchers identify an indirect way of countering a key genetic lesion in neuroblastoma

      Pediatric cancers tend to have relatively "quiet" genomes compared to tumors in adults. They harbor fewer discrete genetic mutations, especially in genes for readily "druggable" targets (such as protein kinases). Instead, these tumors tend to feature other kinds of genetic alterations, such as duplications or translocations.

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      Mentions: MYCN
    4. When good immune cells turn bad

      When good immune cells turn bad

      Investigators at the Children's Center for Cancer and Blood Diseases at Children's Hospital Los Angeles have identified new findings about an immune cell - called a tumor-associated macrophage - that promotes cancer instead of fighting it. They have identified the molecular pathway, known as STAT3, as the mechanism the immune cell uses to foster neuroblastoma, a pediatric cancer, and have demonstrated use of a clinically available agent, ruxolitinib, to block the pathway.

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    5. Modulating T-cell metabolism uncovers new technology for enhancing immunotherapy

      Modulating T-cell metabolism uncovers new technology for enhancing immunotherapy

      T lymphocytes found in tumors and implicated in killing tumor cells cope with the shortage of oxygen and nutrients in the tumor microenvironment by using fat as the main source of energy. Promoting a switch from glucose to fatty acid to generate energy enhances T cell antitumor activity. These findings from a study conducted at The Wistar Institute were published in the journal Cancer Cell.

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    6. Study shows incisionless surgery with MR-HIFU effective in destroying painful bone tumors

      Study shows incisionless surgery with MR-HIFU effective in destroying painful bone tumors

      Doctors from the Sheikh Zayed Institute for Pediatric Surgical Innovation at Children's National Health System have completed a clinical trial that demonstrates how osteoid osteoma, a benign but painful bone tumor that commonly occurs in children and young adults, can be safely and successfully treated using an incisionless surgery method called magnetic resonance-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU).

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      Mentions: Surgery
    7. Out-of-pocket health costs can cause financial problems for survivors of childhood cancer

      Out-of-pocket health costs can cause financial problems for survivors of childhood cancer

      Adult survivors of childhood cancer face an increased likelihood of financial difficulties related to out-of-pocket costs for their health care, compared with adults not affected by childhood cancer. In their report published online in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, investigators from the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) Cancer Center also report that survivors of childhood cancer who pay higher out-of-pocket costs were more than eight times more likely to have trouble paying their medical bills than were either survivors not facing higher out-of-pocket costs or adults without a history of childhood cancer.

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    8. New strategy against childhood cancer

      New strategy against childhood cancer

      Neuroblastoma is a cancer in children that originates in the sympathetic nervous system and has a high mortality. Current treatment includes chemotherapy and radiotherapy with their potentially severe side effects; there is therefore an urgent need for a new improved drug. One potential treatment strategy is to use a drug to target deviant molecular signalling caused by changes in genes.

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    9. New potential treatment for aggressive types of childhood cancer

      New potential treatment for aggressive types of childhood cancer

      A combination of substances that impacts chemical modifications in the DNA of tumours and triggers the tumours to differentiate into harmless nerve cells could represent a new method of treating aggressive forms of neuroblastoma. The new method has been proposed by researchers at Karolinska Institutet, after studies using mice showed that the combination treatment resulted in a significant suppression in tumour growth.

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      Mentions: Treatment
    10. Fighting cancer with immunotherapy: Signaling molecule causes regression of blood vessels

      Fighting cancer with immunotherapy: Signaling molecule causes regression of blood vessels

      Immunotherapy with T-cells offers great hope to people suffering from cancer. Some initial successes have already been made in treating blood cancer, but treating solid tumors remains a major challenge. The signaling molecule interferon gamma, which is produced by T-cells, plays a key role in the therapy. It cuts off the blood supply to tumors, as a new study in the journal Nature reveals.

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    11. Two investigational antitumor agents work better together against MPNST and neuroblastoma

      Two investigational antitumor agents work better together against MPNST and neuroblastoma

      Two investigational agents, Aurora A kinase inhibitor (alisertib) and HSV1716, a virus derived from HSV-1 and attenuated by the deletion of RL1, have shown some antitumor efficacy in early clinical trials as monotherapies. A new study published last week in Oncotarget, however, demonstrates that the combined usage of the agents results in significantly increased antitumor efficacy in models of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) and neuroblastoma.

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    12. Using big data to chart cancer's hidden genetic weaknesses

      Using big data to chart cancer's hidden genetic weaknesses

      "Krogan and his colleagues think differently about where cancer comes from. Rather than see the disease as a problem caused by one or more gene mutations, they see cancer as a breakdown of large, interconnected gene networks. Different genes can malfunction in different people and still produce the same end result because of how they affect the larger networks they are part of, he says. This is why when researchers look at the cancer genomes of two people with very similar lung tumors, for instance, they may see drastically different mutation profiles."

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      Mentions: Treatment Genetics
    13. Research aims to better target treatment for young cancer patients

      Research aims to better target treatment for young cancer patients

      "Dr Wright's research explores a patient's particular genetic makeup through genotyping and researching how drug therapy can be individualised. Her research goal is to improve the patient's overall quality of life by reducing toxicity and relapse rates and increasing overall survival. The collaboration between Wright and Associate Professor Tracey O'Brien from the Sydney Children's Hospital's Oncology department is focused on how an individual tolerates a drug given to them by hospitals and using knowledge about their to tailor the therapy.  "Rather than giving everyone one vial or one tablet of a particular ...

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      Mentions: Treatment
    14. Scientists discover secret to promising new cancer drug

      Scientists discover secret to promising new cancer drug

      "Nutlins, which are in early clinical trials for treating blood cancers, sparked interest worldwide for their ability to stop growth by activating the body's natural cancer-suppressing mechanism - a gene called P53 - while at the same time avoiding some of the damaging effects of chemotherapy. However, until now, it was unknown whether nutlins were killing the cancerous cells, or just suppressing them temporarily. Dr Liz Valente, Dr Brandon Aubrey, Professor Andreas Strasser and colleagues from the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute have found the answer to the long-standing question of how nutlins work by discovering that nutlins cause cancer ...

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      Mentions: Treatment Genetics
    15. New hope for the 20 percent of kids who don't respond to standard cancer treatment

      New hope for the 20 percent of kids who don't respond to standard cancer treatment

      A new drug combination being trialled in a groundbreaking CHU Sainte-Justine/University of Montreal study is giving hope for survival, healing and improved quality of life to the 20% of children who do not respond to standard cancer treatments. Known as DEC-GEN, it's the world's first study involving children with solid tumors or recurrent or refractory leukemia.

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    16. Immunotherapy agent benefits patients with drug-resistant multiple myeloma

      Immunotherapy agent benefits patients with drug-resistant multiple myeloma

      In its first clinical trial, a breakthrough antibody therapy produced at least partial remissions in a third of patients with multiple myeloma who had exhausted multiple prior treatments, investigators at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and other organizations report today online in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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    1-24 of 40 1 2 »
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