1. Children with Non-chromosomal Birth Defects Face Higher Risk of Several Childhood Cancers

    Children with Non-chromosomal Birth Defects Face Higher Risk of Several Childhood Cancers

    CHICAGO — Children with non-chromosomal birth defects such as congenital heart disease had a significantly higher risk of developing childhood cancer than children who did not have birth defects, according to a study presented at the AACR Annual Meeting 2018, April 14-18.

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  2. Quotes

    1. Approximately one in 33 children is born with a birth defect.
    2. This study cannot establish a cause-and-effect relationship between birth defects and childhood cancers, and it is much too soon to make clinical recommendations based on this information.
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