1. Childhood Cancer Survivors Hospitalized Frequently Years After Cancer Treatment

    Childhood Cancer Survivors Hospitalized Frequently Years After Cancer Treatment

    PHILADELPHIA — Survivors of childhood cancers were hospitalized more often and for longer durations because of blood disorders and other problems, many years after cancer treatment was completed, compared with the general population, according to a study published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.

    Anne C. Kirchhoff, PhD, MPH

    Read Full Article
  1. Categories

    1. Research:

      Cancer Cell, Case Report, Cells and Stem Cells, Clinical Research, Conferences, Disease Classification, Drug, Drug Delivery, Drug Resistance, Epigenetics and Epigenomics, General, Genetics, Genomics, Guidelines, Immune Therapy, Induction, Long Term Effects, Low / Intermediate Risk, Nanotechnology, Olfactory Neuroblastoma, Onco-Fertility, Oncogenesis, Other Cancers, Personalized Medicine, Pharma, Pre-Clinical, Prognostics, PubMed, Review, Small Molecules, Surgery, Survivorship, Trials, Tumor Biology, Virotherapy
    2. Business:

      Funding, IP, Pharma
    3. Non-Profit:

      Advocacy, Charity, Events, Foundation, Funding, Human Interest
    4. Press Release:

      Announcement, News, Pharma
    5. General:

      Adolescent and Young Adults, Bioethics, Blog, Burden of Treatment, Children & Families, Diagnosis and Detection, Drug Development, Epidemiology, Imaging, Incidence, Information, News, Overview of the Disease, Pain Control, Palliative Care, Psychosocial, Regulation, Side-Effects, Social, Supportive Care, Treatment
    6. Media:

      Audio, Blogs, Video
  2. Quotes

    1. Our findings demonstrate that childhood cancer survivors face ongoing problems that can lead to hospitalization, even for those who are decades past their original cancer diagnosis. This can negatively impact their quality of life.
    2. We saw higher rates of hospitalization across most cancer types, but not for all cancers, which gives us clues as to which groups of survivors may need better surveillance in the long term.
  3. Authors