1. Microbiome predicts blood infections in pediatric cancer patients

    Microbiome predicts blood infections in pediatric cancer patients

    Cancer patients receive essential medicines, fluids, blood and nutrients through long, flexible tubes called central venous catheters, or central lines. But every year in the United States, these central lines are associated with an estimated 400,000 blood infections, many of which are fatal, and which cost the healthcare system upwards of $18 billion dollars annually. But what if some or even many of these infections aren't, in fact, introduced by central lines?

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  2. Quotes

    1. Basically, we wanted to see if the composition of a cancer patient's microbiome could predict who would go on to develop bloodstream and Clostridium difficile infections.
    2. We can't attributew all of these infectiosn to poor central line hygiene.
    3. It's way too early to suggest that pediatric oncologists make predictions or manipulate patients' microbiomes.